Pioneering

A cool idea, but …

A few farms in Vermont made national news in 2010 for pioneering weed dating. The nights attracted a dozen people, then just five, due to rain, then seven. But things fizzled.

“It was a very exciting idea for the media, but the daters themselves weren’t all that excited about it,” said Barbara Richardson, office manager of the Northeast Organic Farming Association of Vermont. “It sounds like a really cool idea, but it didn’t pan out.”

In fact, at one event, more reporters showed up than participants. Those daters ranged from age 18 to 60, “and there were far more women than men, of course,” she said. So it made for an uncomfortable evening, made more awkward by TV cameras.

Richardson still believes that, if cultivated correctly, weed dating could bring together people with similar values.

“People do meet the loves of their lives at our events,” she said, “but not so far at weed dating.”

The St. Paul farm is planning a second weed dating night, and Joseph Hartmann, who attended Tuesday, plans to go. The 22-year-old recently graduated from the U’s campus in Morris, where he focused on environmental studies. He is now back in Roseville, living with his parents, applying for jobs.

Hartmann called the event “a great introduction to the Twin Cities” and “a chance to meet some really nice people.” He’s never done speed dating, much less weed dating, and while he likes the idea, he’s spotted a problem: the time limit.

“It’s hard to gauge” whether you’d be compatible with someone, he said, “off of a 5-minute conversation in a field somewhere in St. Paul.”

Comments are closed.

i plan to buy tadalafil 10mg