Single

Weeding to do.

The events cater to people who, like Singleton, care about where their food comes from. Those at the student-run farm in St. Paul had majored in subjects such as sustainability, environmental studies and horticulture. Jace Crowe, 22, grew up in Bemidji and recently graduated from the University of Minnesota.
“I’m a single guy, and it’d be nice to meet as many people as I can in the city,” he said. “People who are like me, who are passionate about being good civic members of society.”
A few weeks back, a friend sent Sarah Halvorson-Fried, a GreenCorps member who works with the farm, an article about weed dating.

“I just thought it would be a good idea,” she said, “since we have a lot of weeding to do.”
So she set up a Facebook invite. “Looking for love?” it said. “Yes or no, come hang out and weed with us!” On Tuesday, she waited for attendees beneath the shade of a ginkgo tree, offering them toothpicks laden with cherry tomatoes, basil and fresh mozzarella. The group was quiet, sweaty and slow in the heat.

“Should we start?”
An hour into the 10-minute rotations, Halvorson-Fried paused to consider the event’s success. A few more friends had joined in, adding energy to the evening. “Pesto is totally a sauce,” one woman was arguing.
“It’s going well, I think,” Halvorson-Fried said, eyeing the newly weeded rows. “We’ve gotten a lot done!”
But there are disadvantages to newbies tending to your crops. Paschke accidentally uprooted yet another shallot, flung it into a growing pile and sighed.
“I feel like so far I’ve done more harm than good.”

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